Electricity

Electrical outlets in Djibouti usually supply electricity at 220 volts, and 50Hz. European two-pin plugs with round pins are standard.

Language

Arabic and French are the official languages of Djibouti, but the majority of locals speak either Somali or Afar.

Money

The Djiboutian franc (DJF) is the official currency of Djibouti. The franc is divided into 100 centimes. There are several banks in Djibouti City and a few authorised bureaux de change. Credit cards are seldom accepted and there are only a handful of ATMs in the city, which are frequently out of order and can't be relied on. Outside of the capital banking facilities are almost nonexistent.

Tipping

Tips are not always expected but they are appreciated. Restaurants tend to add a 10 percent service charge to bills, making tipping unnecessary, but waiters, hotel service staff and taxi drivers will appreciate small amounts for good service.

Health

Malaria is a problem in Djibouti and some form of prophylaxis is recommended for all travellers in all areas. Vaccinations are recommended for hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and typhoid. Those planning to spend a lot of time outdoors who may be at risk of animal bites should consider a rabies vaccination as well. Visitors should be up to date on vaccinations for polio, MMR (measles, mumps, rubella), and tetanus-diphtheria.

Travellers should not drink tap water in Djibouti unless it has been boiled, filtered, or chemically disinfected, and should avoid ice in beverages. Travellers shouldn't eat fruit and vegetables unless they have been cooked or peeled, and should eat all cooked meals while still hot.

Medical facilities are extremely limited in Djibouti, even in the capital city, and visitors should ensure that they have comprehensive travel insurance. As the availability of medicine is limited, so visitors should take along any medication they may need in its original packaging and accompanied by a signed and dated letter from a doctor detailing what the medicine is and why it is needed.

Safety

The UK Foreign Office advises against all travel to the border area between Eritrea and Djibouti, but the country is otherwise considered comparatively safe. No significant terrorist attacks targeting foreigners have occurred, though there is an underlying threat of terrorism spilling over from neighbouring countries. Petty, opportunistic crimes such as bag snatching and pickpocketing are fairly common in Djibouti City; violent crimes against foreigners are rare. Street protests in the capital are also rare but can become violent when they do occur and should be avoided by visitors. Seaborne travel along the coast of Djibouti is very dangerous as piracy is common.

Local customs

Customs and culture in Djibouti are reserved and formal: women should maintain modest dress at all times, with their shoulders and legs covered, especially when visiting mosques. Visitors should always address seniors with respect.


Notice: Undefined property: stdClass::$business in /var/www/vhosts/tripreport.com/public_html/components/country-travel-info.php on line 32

Notice: Trying to get property of non-object in /var/www/vhosts/tripreport.com/public_html/components/country-travel-info.php on line 32

Duty free

Visitors to Djibouti must declare all currency and firearms on arrival and departure. One litre of alcoholic beverages can be imported into Djibouti without incurring customs duty. Weapons, drugs, and pornography are strictly prohibited.


Notice: Undefined property: stdClass::$communications in /var/www/vhosts/tripreport.com/public_html/components/country-travel-info.php on line 34

Notice: Trying to get property of non-object in /var/www/vhosts/tripreport.com/public_html/components/country-travel-info.php on line 34

Passport & Visa

A visa is required and all travellers must hold return or onward tickets; required entry documentation for their next destination; sufficient funds to cover their stay in Djibouti or a voucher if travelling in an organised tour. It is highly recommended that travellers' passport have at least six months' validity remaining after the intended date of departure from their travel destination. Immigration officials often apply different rules to those stated by travel agents and official sources.

Entry requirements

US citizens require a passport valid on arrival. A visa is required and can be issued on arrival at the airport if the passenger's visa is valid for a minimum of 6 months from the arrival date, but it is advisable to arrange a visa prior to travel when possible.

UK citizens require a passport valid on arrival. A visa is required and can be issued on arrival at the airport if the passenger's visa is valid for a minimum of 6 months from the arrival date, but it is advisable to arrange a visa prior to travel when possible.

Canadian citizens require a passport valid on arrival. A visa is required and can be issued on arrival at the airport if the passenger's visa is valid for a minimum of 6 months from the arrival date, but it is advisable to arrange a visa prior to travel when possible.

Australian citizens require a passport valid on arrival. A visa is required and can be issued on arrival at the airport if the passenger's visa is valid for a minimum of 6 months from the arrival date, but it is advisable to arrange a visa prior to travel when possible.

South African citizens require a passport valid on arrival. A visa is required and can be issued on arrival at the airport if the passenger's visa is valid for a minimum of 6 months from the arrival date, but it is advisable to arrange a visa prior to travel when possible.

Irish citizens require a passport valid on arrival. A visa is required and can be issued on arrival at the airport if the passenger's visa is valid for a minimum of 6 months from the arrival date, but it is advisable to arrange a visa prior to travel when possible.

New Zealand citizens require a passport valid on arrival. A visa is required and can be issued on arrival at the airport if the passenger's visa is valid for a minimum of 6 months from the arrival date, but it is advisable to arrange a visa prior to travel when possible.

Useful contacts

Tourist Office of Djibouti, Djibouti City: +253 21 35 37 90 or www.visitdjibouti.dj

17 (Police); 19 (Ambulance); 18 (Fire)

Embassies / consulates in other countries

Embassy of the Republic of Djibouti, New York: +1 202 331 0270

Consulate of France (also responsible for Djibouti), London: +44 207 073 1200

Embassy of the Republic of Djibouti, Tokyo (also responsible for Australia): +81 3 5704 0682

Consulate of Djibouti, Johannesburg, South Africa: +27 (0)11 719 9111.

Embassies / consulates in Djibouti

US Embassy, Djibouti City, Djibouti: +253 (0)21 453 000.

United Kingdom Embassy, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia (also responsible for Djibouti): +251 1 61 2354

Canadian Embassy, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia (also responsible for Djibouti): +251 011 317 0000

Australian Honorary Consulate, Djibouti City, Djibouti: +251 21 353 844.

South Africa Embassy, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia (also responsible for Djibouti): +251 11 371 1002

Send a link to this travel guide