Electricity

Electrical current is 230 volts, 50Hz. European-style, round, two-pin plugs are standard.

Language

The official language is Croatian.

Money

The official unit of currency is the Kuna (HRK). One Kuna is divided into 100 Lipa. ATMs are plentiful throughout the country and banks, authorised bureaux de change, post offices and most hotels exchange foreign currency. Banks open Monday to Saturday and some banks also open on Sundays in the main cities. Major credit cards are widely accepted at the main hotels and restaurants, and may be used to draw cash from ATMs which are widely available throughout the country.

Tipping

In tourist or upmarket restaurants, a tip of 10 percent will be appreciated. But otherwise, it's common to just round up the bill if the service has been good, unless a service charge has already been added. Tour guides expect to be tipped.

Health

No vaccinations are required. The medical facilities and care in Croatia are fairly good, with free emergency medical care available to EU citizens with a European Health Insurance Card (EHIC). After Brexit, the Global Health Insurance Card (GHIC) replaced the European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) for UK citizens. The GHIC allows UK citizens access to state healthcare during visits to the EU. The GHIC is not valid in Norway, Iceland, Liechtenstein or Switzerland, nor is it an alternative to travel insurance. Non-EU nationals are advised to take out comprehensive travel insurance, and those who need particular medications should take the supply needed for the duration of their stay with them, plus a doctor's letter to get the items through customs.

Safety

Most visits to Croatia are trouble free. Crime levels are low and violent crime is rare, but petty theft can be a problem in busy tourist areas so it's worth keeping a careful eye on valuables. Outside normal tourist routes, travellers should be aware that unexploded mines might remain in rural areas, particularly in Eastern Slavonia and the former Krajina.

Tourists are urged to be cautious in former conflict areas, including the aforementioned Eastern Slavonia, Brodsko-Posavska County, Karlovac County, areas around Zada and in more remote areas of the Plitvice Lakes National Park. They should stay on known safe roads and areas, and check with authorities before setting out into remote regions.

Local customs

In some towns and cities, it's prohibited or considered inappropriate to walk around town centres shirtless or in swimming costumes. In some places, such as parts of Dubrovnik, there is signage indicating that people are required to cover up and that fines will be imposed on those that don't comply. Even when there is no such signage, travellers are advised to be sensitive to local conventions and sensibilities.

Doing business

Business in Croatia tends to be quite formal. Punctuality is key, dress should be smart and handshakes are the preferred form of greeting.

Titles and surnames are usually used unless otherwise indicated and business cards are often exchanged at the beginning of a meeting. English and German are widely spoken but any attempt at speaking some Croatian will be appreciated. Women frequently hold high positions in business and are well respected.

Building a good working relationship is important in Croatia and it's useful to work with a reliable local partner. Although Croatia appears typically European in its dealings, business can take some time to conclude. Business hours are usually 8am to 4pm, Monday to Friday.

Duty free

Non-EU travellers to Croatia can enter the country with the following items without incurring customs duty: 200 cigarettes or 50 cigars or 250g of tobacco; 4 litres of wine, 1 litre of spirits and up to 16 litres of beer; and other goods up to the value of HRK 3,200 if arriving by air or HRK 2,200 if arriving by other means of transport.

Communications

The international access code for Croatia is +385 and WiFi availability is good.

Passport & Visa

All foreign passengers to Croatia must hold return/onward tickets and the necessary travel documentation for their next destination, as well as proof of sufficient funds (at least EUR 70.- per day of stay, at least EUR 30.- per day of stay if holding a confirmed invitation or a tourist voucher). It is highly recommended that your passport has at least six months validity remaining after your intended date of departure from your travel destination. Immigration officials often apply different rules to those stated by travel agents and official sources.

Entry requirements

US citizens must present a passport valid for three months beyond period of intended stay. Visas are not required for stays of up to 90 days.

UK nationals must have a passport valid for the period of intended stay in Croatia, or valid for three months beyond period of intended stay, depending on the endorsement in the passport. For stays of up to 90 days, a visa is not required for holders of British passports endorsed British Citizen, British National (Overseas), British Overseas Citizen, British Overseas Territories Citizen, British Protected Person or British Subject. Other UK passport holders should check with the embassy whether a visa is required for travel.

Canadian citizens must have a passport valid for three months beyond period of intended stay in Croatia. No visa is required for stays of up to 90 days.

Australian citizens must have a passport valid for three months beyond the period of intended stay in Croatia. No visa is required for stays of up to 90 days.

South African nationals must have a passport valid for three months beyond the period of intended stay in Croatia, and a visa is required, unless already holding a multiple-entry Schengen C visa.

Irish nationals must have a passport valid for the period of intended stay in Croatia. No visa is required.

New Zealand citizens must have a passport valid for three months beyond the period of intended stay in Croatia. No visa is required for stays of up to 90 days.

Useful contacts

Croatian National Tourist Board, Zagreb: +385 (0)1 469 9333 or www.croatia.hr

112 (General Emergency Helpline)

Embassies / consulates in other countries

Embassy of Croatia, Washington DC, United States: +1 202 588 5899.

Embassy of Croatia, London, United Kingdom: +44 (0)20 7387 2022.

Embassy of Croatia, Ottawa, Canada: +1 613 562 7820.

Embassy of Croatia, Canberra, Australia: +61 (0)2 6286 6988.

Embassy of Croatia, Pretoria, South Africa: +27 (0)12 342 1206.

Embassy of Croatia, Dublin, Ireland: +353 (0)1 476 7181

Consulate of Croatia, Auckland, New Zealand: +64 274 998850.

Embassies / consulates in Croatia

United States Embassy, Zagreb: +385 (0)1 661 2200.

British Embassy, Zagreb: +385 (0)1 600 9100.

Canadian Embassy, Zagreb: +385 (0)1 488 1200.

Australian Embassy, Zagreb: +385 (0)1 489 1200.

South African Embassy, Budapest (also responsible for Croatia): +36 1 392 0999

Embassy of Ireland, Zagreb: +385 (0)1 627 8920.

New Zealand Consulate, Rome, Italy (also responsible for Croatia): +39 06 853 7501.

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