Things to do in Limerick

Adare photo

Adare

Nestled in a wooded landscape among the picturesque farmlands of the Golden Vale, Adare is known as one of the prettiest villages in Ireland. It is conveniently located just ten mi…

Adare

Nestled in a wooded landscape among the picturesque farmlands of the Golden Vale, Adare is known as one of the prettiest villages in Ireland. It is conveniently located just ten miles (16km) from Limerick City, and connected to many other Irish towns by bus. The small village is centred on a street of thatched Tudor-style cottages and hedges, surrounded by intriguing medieval churches and castle ruins.

Attractions include Desmond Castle, the Trinitarian Abbey, the Augustinian Priory, and the Franciscan Friary. A visit to the Adare Heritage Centre is a must for anyone interested in the rich history of this town, which dates back to the Norman conquest of Ireland. The exhibitions offer some good contextual information on the churches and abbeys to be visited in the area, and the information is available in five different languages. Adare is within easy distance of three golf courses, and the town has a good selection of restaurants, pubs and craft shops. Adare's Old Creamery is a hit with visitors searching out quality tea and treats, and the shop's Christmas and Halloween-themed merchandise is pretty entertaining. For a bit of fresh air and some insight into Celtic worship, visitors can stroll around the lovely Celtic Park gardens.

Lough Gur photo

Lough Gur

Lough Gur is a lake situated less than 14 miles (23km) south east of Limerick. Although the area's lovely scenery provides enough reason to visit, its remarkable archaeological rem

Lough Gur

Lough Gur is a lake situated less than 14 miles (23km) south east of Limerick. Although the area's lovely scenery provides enough reason to visit, its remarkable archaeological remains are the main attraction.

Lough Gur has been inhabited by humans since about 3000 BC, and the extensive remains make it one of Ireland's most important archaeological sites. There are relics from the Stone Age, Bronze Age, Iron Age and Early Christian civilisations, as well as Medieval ruins all in one area. These show that Lough Gur has been continuously inhabited for at least 5,500 years. The Grange stone circle near the lake is the largest in Ireland and is seen by locals as a place of mystic power, similar to Stone Henge. There are also grave sites, a dolmen (rock monument), crannogs (artificial islands) and some ring forts.

The site contains a Heritage Centre with exhibitions on Lough Gur's history. They detail the significance of the archaeological remains, and bring the place to life in the imagination. However, the best way to explore the area is on a walking tour with one of the very well-informed guides. Visitors can also take self-guided audio tours. There are lovely picnic areas and walking trails to enjoy, and a small shop that sells snacks and refreshments.

Website www.loughgur.com

Opens Summer: Monday to Friday: 10am-5pm Saturday and Sunday: 12pm-6pm Winter: Daily: 12pm-4pm

Admission

Adults €5, Children €3.

Kilkee photo

Kilkee

Kilkee has its roots as an exclusive Victorian seaside resort for wealthy merchant families. It's known for the beautiful sandy beach that now draws families from all over the UK. …

Kilkee

Kilkee has its roots as an exclusive Victorian seaside resort for wealthy merchant families. It's known for the beautiful sandy beach that now draws families from all over the UK. In its heyday, Kilkee attracted some famous people. Charlotte Bronte spent her honeymoon in the little village, and Lord Tennyson also came holidaying.

The beach is great for swimming and is protected by a reef, which tends to ensure calm waters in the bay. In fact, it is said to be one of the safest beaches in Ireland. It's a popular diving spot, and offers several picturesque swimming areas, including a formation of natural rock pools called the Pollock Holes. It's also a well-loved sailing and boating destination. If the weather isn't kind, visitors can still have some fun at Kilkee Waterworld.

Kilkee has land-based attractions and activities as well, including a golf course and a number of restaurants and bars in town. Kilkee gets busy in late June each year, when it hosts the Hell of the West Triathlon. In fact, the seaside village is busy for most of the summer season.

Website www.kilkee.ie

Transport

There is a regular bus service to Kilkee from Kilrush, Ennis and Limerick.

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